Yes, it’s swap time again — this time a “Tiny House” swap — how could I resist?

I was partnered with LesliesHappyHeart. I love Leslie’s work (her Mystery Critter is the pattern I’m using as a base to practice my embroidery skills), but it would be hard to find two people whose styles differ as much as ours do.

If we were twins, I’d be the evil one.

Leslie reports liking “blues and purples”, but “bright colors all mixed together too!” and her first description of a house that appeals to her was “wonky houses in bright colors.” And she had a special request for the house to include a heart.

I like swaps that push me out of my comfort zone.

Tiny House Swap: Love Shack, Baby

Every window is filled with flowering plants… where the “bloom” is a heart.

Tiny House Swap: Love Shack, Baby Closeup

The back wall of the house is a sky with fluffy white clouds. Why? Because it’s a fantasy house and that’s what I wanted it to be. :D

Tiny House Swap: Side View

To create this house, I first designed it in Illustrator:

Tiny House Swap: Illustrator

Initially, I planned to transfer the computer image to wood. Remember how that worked for me before? Well, the attempts on this piece were equally unsuccessful (and frustrating). But one failed image transfer process did contribute to the final house. I discovered that when you coat card-stock with Elmer’s Glue, let it dry (thoroughly) and then use a laserjet printer to print on that layer of glue, you get much brighter colors than when you print on plain paper.

Tiny House Swap: Coated Paper

WORD TO THE WISE: Don’t plan on using this process if you’re short on time. While the print was mostly dry-to-the-touch fairly quickly, it took days, yes, days for the ink to fully dry. Days.

Don’t believe me? Well, you should know that I ruined two or three houses by working on them before the ink was fully dry. And if you think that didn’t put me in a foul mood, well you just don’t know me at all.

After printing it out, the house needed additional support and both the front and back pieces of the house were glued to thin cardboard. I’m here to tell you that the packaging from Amy’s Frozen Dinners is my favorite source of thin cardboard — it’s really lovely to work with.

The final piece stood approximately 3.5″ tall — here’s the proof.

Tiny House Swap: Scale

And because there can never be enough of the B52s in the world:

Entered in the Unique Crafters, anything goes challenge